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Thread: 'possible' interesting Shingleback behaviour reported.

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    They later decided that the male wasn't guarding his mate. The audio interview mentions that they initially thought it was the case but decided otherwise after testing the theory. I'm not sure if I'd trust the test results in this case though, a radio controlled toy car made to look like a male shingleback. The male ran away and that's the basis of what changed their mind on the guarding female idea.

    The audio interview is very good if you haven't yet listened to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bearded Penguin View Post
    They later decided that the male wasn't guarding his mate. The audio interview mentions that they initially thought it was the case but decided otherwise after testing the theory. I'm not sure if I'd trust the test results in this case though, a radio controlled toy car made to look like a male shingleback. The male ran away and that's the basis of what changed their mind on the guarding female idea.

    The audio interview is very good if you haven't yet listened to it.
    The last paper I found from them was http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...03347209005053 and while some of the jargon was beyond me, they did note, like you say, that mate guarding couldn't explain the pairing. They also showed that the pairing continued after mating was over. When you think that this group is pretty much the only one studying these lizards' behaviour, you realise how much else we probably don't know.

    I heard the interview on RN; I recall that the current project leader got choked up when he was describing a shingleback staying by its dead mate, trying to rouse it, for 2 days. They're trying to crowd-fund the research to keep it going; the uni has a donation page.

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